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  1. I think coinbase is fine, its relatively easy for individuals holding lesser known altcoins to trade for something available. On a kind of related note SENS.org recently raised 25 million USD in crypto by being a "sacrifice address" for an airdrop of a new (and in my opinion kind of shady) altcoin. I'm really not sure how that will play out since they where marketing the donation as tax deductible but participants where given tokens as a reward. There are charities like that where you get say a pin and the idea of getting an NFT as a badge for donations is equivalent but when the partic
    2 points
  2. Youtube link: Dolly@20 Symposium - Lissa Herron I thought this was interesting and worth sharing.
    2 points
  3. I think there are a few DAOs in existence that could supply funding in return for recognition. In fact crypto currency communities as a whole have funded all sorts of things just to be seen as a community that is made up of charitable people. But it does not make much sense to take any money from a research company and put it into a DAO or for a public company to create a DAO to receive charitable funds that are intended to fund the company when people could just donate directly to the company without the additional complication of a DAO. There are cases where it might be a good i
    2 points
  4. Some time ago, the folks at openphilanthropy.org posted a long article with their objections against DRACO: https://www.openphilanthropy.org/informal-writeup-dracos-potential-antiviral-treatment No one has yet undertaken a rebuttal, so I thought the time is right. I can't say I'm thrilled about the idea of posting and discussing a link with so much misinformation in it, but given the likelihood of it coming up in any serious Google search or due diligence investigation, it's better to just address it head-on. I'd like to discuss each objection in a detail when I can, so this will be a thr
    2 points
  5. Our crowdfunding campaign is now live! https://donate.kimermed.co.nz/campaign/2/ending-viral-disease It will run for the next 30 days. Our goal is to raise at least NZ $50,000 (USD $33,000). For donations of $100 or more, you can choose to sponsor a particular virus. The way this works is that you can pick a virus that interests or concerns you from a list, and we will direct 50% of your donation toward research on that virus. We also look at sponsorship as a kind of dollar-weighted vote, to help us prioritize our research. We are also offering discount
    2 points
  6. Hopefully latent viruses like HIV and HSV can be counteracted by a combination of Vtose (for lytic infection), an LRA (Latency Reversing Agent)1, and a viral reseeding blocker (such as fusion and integrase inhibitors, N/NNRTIs, or protease inhibitors). The great thing is Vtose need not be used alone and will likely have synergism for the viruses we have other treatment for. Of course it will also be our very first way to fight the vast majority of other viral diseases where we have no treatments. 1. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2019.03060/full
    2 points
  7. Kimer Med was founded in Aug 2020, so we're new, and we're doing all of the things that new companies do: fundraising, recruiting, legal, etc, etc. I'm curious about Rider, as well. We tried to contact him through his Institute, through his old employer, people he used to work with, a bunch of old emails, and so on. No luck. I haven't seen any evidence that Big Pharma killed DRACO. However, I believe they do have an influence on NIH and similar funding agencies in the USA. We're based in New Zealand, not the US, and we aren't pursuing funding from US gov agencies, so we're somewhat i
    2 points
  8. The safety concerns were debunked above. It's possible that a low-dose DRACO administered by nose spray may end up being an inexpensive and effective treatment for the common cold. We already know DRACO is effective against Rhinovirus, so that's an important first step. As with any new drug development, there are, of course, questions to be answered and investigations to be done. However, based on what we know today, we don't see any show stoppers. HIV is a Lentivirus, which is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA enveloped retrovirus: These viruses are similar to Dengue vir
    2 points
  9. Thank you for your response. Actually, evolution has evolved a separate immune system for the brain, composed mainly of tissue-resident macrophages, that handle the lion's share of anti-infective strategies. This is distinct from the blood-borne immune system. While the blood-borne immune system's main tactic against viruses is to either apoptose or ingest the infected cell, the brain's immune system takes a radically different approach. The brain's immune system focuses on containing the spread of the infection and triggering intracellular processes in the infected neurons that would
    2 points
  10. There are a few questions that seem to come up with almost every extended conversation about Kimer Med and what we're doing. This isn't meant to be an investor disclosure document, or anything like that; it's just an informal discussion of where our thinking is, based on what we know today: It's been 9 years since Rider's 2011 PLoS ONE paper about DRACO. No one else has done anything significant with DRACO since then. Rider's MIT/LL patents on DRACO effectively prevented work like this until recently, when they were abandoned. We strongly believe in the visio
    1 point
  11. Hi, I hope you had a good holiday and a happy new year. Just a short update this week, since as I mentioned last time, New Zealand pretty much closes down from mid-Dec to mid-Jan for the holidays. Things will finally be coming back to life next week. On the science side, the protein from the second fabrication batch that I mentioned in my last update is now in-hand. As the last step of fabrication, we run the dissolved compound through a 0.2 micron filter, which effectively sterilizes it. After that, it can be safely stored at 4C (in a standard refrigerator). The
    1 point
  12. The molecular weight of VTose is roughly 35 kDa. One of the earliest papers about transduction tags showed effectiveness with a protein with a MW of 120 kDa: In vivo protein transduction: delivery of a biologically active protein into the mouse - PubMed (nih.gov) Transport of even larger proteins is undoubtedly possible.
    1 point
  13. Thank you so much for letting me know. I have backed the campaign. :)
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  14. Our Crowdfunding Campaign started today! https://donate.kimermed.co.nz/campaign/2/ending-viral-disease
    1 point
  15. With a broad-spectrum antiviral such as VTose, one of the most common questions we get is whether it will work on particular viruses. The short answer is that we won't know for sure until we test. However, based on the known mechanism of action, we have a pretty good idea of how things should work. In the original paper about DRACO, they tested against 15 different viruses, and found it was effective against all of them. Importantly, those tests included a wide range of different virus types. For example, positive and negative sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), double-stranded RNA (d
    1 point
  16. Kimer Med Team, It seems that the weekly updates have become less than weekly. This post is not meant to chastise but to remind you that there are those of us out there that would greatly benefit from news and updates from your organization, regardless of whether or not you have made any scientific or business related progress. I think that I can speak for most when I say that Dr. Rider's failed attempts at bringing life to DRACO were an incredibly disheartening thing. The reassurance that there are still heroes like yourselves that are truly trying to make broad spectrum antivirals a rea
    1 point
  17. Let's start with how human cells normally defend themselves against viruses. One way this works is through antibodies. These large, Y-shaped proteins are produced by plasma B cells, a type of white blood cell. Antibodies attach to certain pathogens, effectively tagging them for further attack by the immune system. However, we only make antibodies after being exposed to a pathogen. If the pathogen mutates, or if you're exposed to a new one, antibodies won't work. Another way our cells defend themselves is by using a certain protein (called Protein Kinase R) to identify the products of viru
    1 point
  18. We don't have the staggeringly massive overhead of big pharma, and we're not interested in creating drugs which merely suppress viral infections for decades at a high monthly cost, as they are. It's too early to say what the ultimate cost can be, but - assuming, of course, proof of efficacy and safety in humans - we expect that it will be affordably priced for a large number of individuals.
    1 point
  19. I can't wait to see what is planned and I look forward to hearing more! 😁
    1 point
  20. Sorry, it's too soon to say. We have some exciting things in the works. It'll be worth the wait.
    1 point
  21. I'm glad to hear that you think our project is exciting. We do too! Creating and running a quality crowdfunding campaign takes quite a bit of time and effort. Unfortunately I can't say too much about it yet -- other than we're actively working on it. Members of our email list will be the first to hear when it gets close: https://kimermed.co.nz/landing
    1 point
  22. There is no general rule on who should be able to vote on what issues. Currently many DAOs are used to invest into blockchain infrastructure and applications. Here it makes sense to encourage various ideas to be tried. Some DAO frame works like e.g. Moloch DAO are optimized for that sort of funding and voting. But there is no general rule. Other frameworks give you a lot more freedom to tailor the functionality to what a project needs. One general idea is to align all interested parties, e.g. the management, researchers, marketers and investors by using a token (or multiple tokens) which
    1 point
  23. Thank you for the reply! Your arguments make sense. And the two additional papers give indeed some more legitimacy to Rider's work.
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  24. It's disturbing to me, too. In fact, so much so that I co-founded a company to carry the work forward. The professionals I've discussed Rider's work with so far have had a couple of minor technical criticisms of his paper, but nothing that would invalidate his results. Keep in mind that the PLoS ONE journal, where the original paper was published, is peer-reviewed--which means the reviewer professionals also didn't see anything significantly wrong. If you carefully read the paper, it's actually a tour de force. Rider did much more work than he had to for a basic paper. My guess
    1 point
  25. The half-life of virions (virus particles outside of a cell) can be relatively short -- on the order of a few hours. For example, see: https://bionumbers.hms.harvard.edu/bionumber.aspx?id=101618&ver=3&trm=lifespan&org= But the details depend on things like the specific virus, the nature of the extracellular environment, whether antibodies are present for it, and so on. As you can see in the diagram below (for HIV), when a virus enters a cell (after "Fusion"), it sheds it's outer layer, which is what enables it to infect other cells. That means, yes, when the cell die
    1 point
  26. Is it possible to create a topical DRACO for use against HPV warts? Could this come under a cosmetic classification avoiding the need for FDA approval?
    1 point
  27. There are a lot of variables and moving parts, so it's a little hard to predict with any certainty. My best guess at the moment is that we could do it in 5 yrs if we have adequate funding. Should take much less for initial use in animals through vet specialists, maybe 18 to 24 months.
    1 point
  28. Cross-posting from a response I wrote on the Longecity forum: Necroptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in necrosis. In necrosis, a cell effectively lyses and releases its interior contents to the surrounding environment. Because of that, necrosis activates the immune system, causing inflammation and other downstream effects. As I explain in my thread here: we don't want necrosis, and DRACO doesn't use necrosis. Therefore, the necroptosis pathways don't matter. Necroptosis is also known as "Caspase Independent Cell Death" (CICD). DRACO actually relies on Caspase
    1 point
  29. Yes, that's definitely an area we want to explore. Retroviruses as well as Herpesviruses like Varicella have a latent phase. The good news is that as long as a virus remains latent, it also isn't damaging the cell or interfering with its function. It's only when the virus starts to replicate inside the cell (Lytic replication) that it causes cell damage or cell lysis or immune system activation -- and when Lytic replication begins, dsRNA appears. It may be that the change from Latent Replication to Lytic Replication actually works in our favor when infections are widespread, allowing infe
    1 point
  30. On the theory side, DRACOs are mostly made from parts of two existing human proteins. The only non-human component is a very short peptide (roughly 9 to 11 amino acids), which is a transduction tag. Based on this, while some immunogenic response is possible, as with all drugs, the odds of it being significant are small. It's certainly much safer and less immunogenic than current approaches that use entire active viruses to deliver payloads inside cells. On the practical side, the mice that were treated with DRACO in the 2011 study showed no signs of either toxicity or immunogenecity, in s
    1 point
  31. Rider's paper used two methods of administration: intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) and intranasal (i.n.). I.p. injection in mice is often used simply because it's easier than other forms of parenteral administration. I.n. basically consists of letting the mouse inhale the substance through its nose (see the short video below). Neither of these are complex in mice. In humans, we don't know the best method of administration yet, and in fact it might vary from one virus to another. The equivalent of i.n. in people would just be a nose spray; i.p. would be an intravenous injection o
    1 point
  32. To add to what Rick said: it's true that it cannot be patented, but it's also true that there are many other potentially patentable aspects that become evident after investigating it deeply, as we have.
    1 point
  33. Correct. Once a patent expires or is abandoned, it effectively becomes public domain.
    1 point
  34. That's very interesting, I'll read more about that. One thing I'd note is that not every viral infection is going to be hitting the brain. Another is that VTose would not be continuously administered. It would only affect virally infected brain cells during the administration time. However, this is certainly an area that will need further thought over time and perhaps modifications to the molecule so that it doesn't pass through the blood-brain barrier.
    1 point
  35. It's not the case that killing infected neurons is undesirable. An ideal example is probably rabies. The viruses traverse the peripheral nervous system, and then into the central nervous system, and ultimately into the brain with 100% mortality rate (unless stopped in time by administration of the vaccine.) Killing any infected neurons is the only way to stop the infection, and it's what a vaccine activated immune system response will do (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6790004).
    1 point
  36. Yes, there's evidence that different transduction tags can be used to target different tissues. There are more than 1000 known transduction tags these days; it's an area of active interest and study. The method of drug administration also has an effect on which tissues are targeted. For example, intranasal seems to target mainly the lungs and respiratory system. Infected neurons are an interesting case. The immune system will already be trying to destroy them. Whether it's better to let the infection and immune processes continue, or to help the immune system by killing the infected
    1 point
  37. That's all good news regarding the low dose, low toxicity, and persistence for a moderate amount of time.
    1 point
  38. DMSO could well be an alternative to injection. It might also be useful for viral skin lesions, such as Herpes or Shingles. For final delivery into cells, the current approach uses special "transduction tags." These are short sequences of amino acids at one end of our protein. Studies have shown these peptides encourage cells to "ingest" the entire protein, bringing it inside the cell, and even inside the nucleus. I don't know whether DMSO would work as an alternative to transduction tags, but it's certainly an idea worth exploring.
    1 point
  39. VTose is a protein. During the prior testing, their version of the drug persisted in uninfected HeLa cells for up to 8 days. At some stage, it will decay and be catabolized like other cellular proteins (often due to thermal or enzymatic effects). While it's active, this residual suggests two possibilities: 1) some antiviral prophylactic effect may linger for multiple days after initial dosing, and 2) the dose required to treat an active infection may end up being relatively low. In fact, their effectiveness studies showed that only 10 nM/L is enough to be effective. That concentration is rough
    1 point
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